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Her Heart Matters

The facts surrounding women and heart disease are startling.

Heart Quiz for Women Only

As a woman, do you know what your risk is for developing heart disease? You might be surprised. Take this quiz to see how much you know about heart disease in women. The quiz is based on information from the American Heart Association.

1. Coronary heart disease develops gradually over many years. It can easily go undetected.
2. Women don't have to worry about cardiovascular disease. It's mainly a man's problem.
3. If a woman has a heart attack, she is more likely to survive than a man.
4. Women are less likely to get heart disease after menopause than before.
5. When men reach middle age, or about 55, their blood cholesterol levels start to rise. But women's cholesterol levels seem to stay about the same.
6. African-American females are more likely than white females to die from coronary heart disease or stroke.
7. Which of the following is the single most important thing a woman can do to reduce her risk for heart attack?
8. Women smokers double their chances of having a heart attack over women who don't smoke.
9. Women can reduce their risks for heart attack and stroke by following which of these lifestyle habits?
10. Women with heart disease have a lower risk for stroke.
Women's Heart Health

Knowing the facts can better prepare you to take a more proactive role in helping combat heart disease in yourself and those you love. Please, take a few minutes to review some of these surprising statistics.

  • Women tend to develop heart disease about 10 years later than men. However, heart disease continues to be the #1 killer of women in the United States. 
  • Today, more women than men are likely to die of heart disease. In 1983, it was the other way around. This is due, in part, to women being older and having other significant health problems at the time a heart attack occurs. 
  • Only 40% of women who were having a heart attack actually thought they were, because they didn’t experience pain in their chest. 
  • Only 25% of women who should be taking aspirin therapy (a baby aspirin each day to protect their heart) are actually doing so. 
  • Minority women in particular are at risk for heart disease – nearly half of African-American women have some form of heart disease, compared to 32% for Caucasian women. 
  • Awareness of heart disease as the #1 killer of women has increased by 23% in the last five years, from 34% to 57%. Yet 43 million women are still living with heart disease. 
  • People who are physically active reduce their risk of developing coronary heart disease by up to 50% and decrease their risk of premature death by 20-30%. 
  • Of the 1 million people per year who die of cardiovascular diseases, 53% are women. 
  • Only 8% of women consider cardiovascular disease their greatest health risk, yet nearly 1 in 2 will die of it. Whereas only 1 in every 33 women will succumb to breast cancer. 
  • People who are 30 pounds or more overweight are more likely to develop heart disease even if they have no other risk factors. 
  • The number of people with diabetes is growing at a rate of up to 10% per year. 
  • Having diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and heart failure 2- to 6-fold. 
  • Having hypertension doubles the risk for cardiovascular disease and heart failure.

For more information on women's heart health, call us at 314-996-3627 or contact us online.

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